Song of Myself – A poem by Walt Whitman

Song of Myself is a poem by Walt Whitman. In this video the poem is read by Tom O’Bedlam. This poem was published in 1855 where Whitman celebrates himself and suggests that parts of him are also parts of the reader.

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5 thoughts on “Song of Myself – A poem by Walt Whitman

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  3. Edenfantasys

    In the second (1856) edition, Whitman used the title “Poem of Walt Whitman, an American,” which was shortened to “Walt Whitman” for the third (1860) edition.

  4. TrekMovers

    “I’m almost sheepish to admit that I first heard of ‘I Sing the Body Electric’ as a song (by title only) from the 19 movie ‘Fame,’ which in itself had pointed me to a certain path of gay self-discovery. But no matter, the point being I was made aware of Uncle Walt, albeit I was still too young and living in the Philippines, so it took several more years until I read selections from  I sing the body electric, The armies of those I love engirth me and I engirth them, They will not let me off till I go with them, respond to them, And discorrupt them, and charge them full with the charge of the soul. Was it doubted that those who corrupt their own bodies conceal themselves? And if those who defile the living are as bad as they who defile the dead? And if the body does not do fully as much as the soul? And if the body were not the soul, what is the soul?

  5. Antholpholo

    In the second (1856) edition, Whitman used the title “Poem of Walt Whitman, an American,” which was shortened to “Walt Whitman” for the third (1860) edition.

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